Monday, July 6, 2020

What Do You Miss?





My daughter texted after our video chat the other day, and said that our 4-year-old grandson had cried a bit after we ended our call.  His complaint was "I miss Grandma and Papa!"

I really miss him too, and I'm sorry he cried, but I'd rather have him cry about missing us or any other family member than about not getting a new toy or something else he wants.

The same is true for me, or anyone else who might express longing for something they miss.  

We should miss people, not possessions.

As we settle into the "new normal," what is it you miss about your old life?

  • The freedom to call a friend and meet for coffee or lunch?
  • The freedom to enter a store without a mask?
  • The freedom to attend a movie, concert, play, or sporting event in a theater or arena?

You might be missing steady employment, and if you're in that uncertain situation, I truly feel sorry for you.  My son, a massage therapist, has been unable to see clients for three months.  Another friend, a musician, has had all of his engagements cancelled until September.  They and many others are struggling right now.

However, do you really miss the busyness?  The constant rushing?  The endless consumerism?  The sense of entitlement and ingratitude that comes with certainty and comfort?

We need health, safety, and secure employment (which was not even assured in the "old normal").  And we really need each other.  We need uninterrupted family time.  We need to reach out to loved ones for connection and interaction.  And we need time to rest, think, read, and grow.

It would be fantastic if our current situation has taught us appreciation for all of the little things.  In the "new normal," I hope we treasure

  • Hugs
  • Dinner with friends
  • Children playing in the park
  • Teens playing sports or hanging out with friends
  • Seeing colleagues at work, instead of meeting on a screen
  • Time spent creating, not because we have no place to go, but because we realize that life is more than work and shopping
  • Physical presence more than physical possessions



Photo by Humphrey Muleba on Unsplash





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